Tag Archives: CW

Build a Computer to CW Interface

Using a  well-known circuit, I show you how to build a simple computer interface so  your logging software can send CW through your radio.

The logging software simulates someone using a straight key.  It changes the voltage on an RS-232 pin and the electronic circuit uses a transistor as a switch, grounding the lines as though someone grounded the contacts of a straight key.

This interface will let you work a contest or pile-up using your logging software – without having to use a key or paddle.

The circuit diagram: http://www.n3fjp.com/cwschematic.html

N3FJP website: http://www.n3fjp.com

Tripp-Lite USB to Serial Converter: See it on Amazon.com

Using the Mountain Topper QRP Radio

I got the last Mountain Topper QRP radio of 2015 from LNR Precision (according to Ryan).

I’ve been having a ball with this gem for the past 10 days.  In this video, I tell you about the radio and then show you how to use nearly every feature.  It’s a long video that I made for those who may be interested in this jewel-like little rig… which should be EVERYONE!

Improving Your CW Speed with Morse Runner

A fun and effective way to improve your CW character recognition and gain speed is through the software program called Morse Runner.

Morse Runner is a contest simulator that lets you work a virtual “pile-up” (multiple people calling you at the same time).  You can control the parameters so that your session is as easy or as white-knuckled hectic as you wish.  This program really makes a game out of morse code.  Note: This program assumes that you already know your letters and numbers… it’s not for learning morse code but for helping you to improve your speed.

Download it from the author’s website: http://www.dxatlas.com/morserunner/

The Case for Morse Code

If you’re into QRP, I want to encourage you to consider learning morse code. While you can make plenty of contacts with voice or digital, it’s hard to beat the “cw” (continuous wave) mode for efficiency.

With voice, everything you say is stretched out and occupies about 3 kHz of bandwidth. With morse code, that energy is compressed/condensed into a sliver of the bandwidth, concentrating the energy like a laser pointer!